“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart; I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5).

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Being pro-life doesn’t end with opposing abortion, being pro-life continues long after the birth of these children. Pro-life means protecting and preserving all human life. These are points that too often get lost in the shouting back and forth.

No one wants to talk about abortion for fear of offending, and I get that. Yet I can’t help wondering, when Paul preached the Good News to the Gentiles and told them they were worshiping false gods, how much he was worried about offending them; to Paul, his was a mission of mercy and urgency. Think about it, a Christian outright telling a Hindu or a Muslim, for example, that their religions were false would qualify as offensive and bigoted hate speech today. As Christians, our speech should primarily be “with grace”; however, it is to be “seasoning with salt”, to have good sense and point, so as to be effective for the inquirer or against the scoffer. Salt is spoken of as a preservative from corruption, and a warning against corrupt words (Mark 9:50; Colossians 4:6). If we massage our message in order to suit the world and avoid offense, under the guise of reaching people, then on behalf of whom are we reaching them? (2 Timothy 4). Christ wasn’t nailed to a cross, because people liked what he had to say. 

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I set you apart; I appointed you as a prophet to the nations” (Jeremiah 1:5). Even before God forms us in our mother’s womb, he knows us, has a plan for us, and his love and providence endures; a message that reverberates throughout scripture. Sadly, we’ve lived with this atrocity for so long now that at least half of us have come to the view of abortion as healthcare, as opposed to what it truly is—life and death. Conversely, the other half of us, too often, miss the magnitude of the responsibility that accompanies our position on life; our responsibility doesn’t end in the delivery room. May God have mercy and forgive us all for what we’ve done and for what we’ve failed to do. There is guilt on both sides of the picket line. My heart grieves. 

The ancient Canaanites ritually sacrificed their young, as a part of worshiping the deity Baal, and I wonder how it was that so many chose to engage in such a gruesome practice? More confounding, how could the Israelites be seduced into taking part in such a horror show? How could hearts have been so hardened? How could a people, any people, grow so desensitized, whether in participation or in apathy? The opportune situation, often heart wrenching, often desperate, always manages to present itself, an extreme case, a point from which to inspire a rallying cry that seizes our emotions and ultimately leads us astray. Satan knows exactly what he’s doing and isn’t opposed to exploiting our desperation, our guilt, and our fear, and the consequences can echo for generations. But there is good news! We have a great high priest, an advocate, a redeemer in Jesus Christ, full of mercy and grace. We need only to repent and ask, and he will forgive us.

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