“Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation? Tell me, if you understand” (Job 38:4).

Untitled

I didn’t know that I was going to write this post until this morning, as I was getting ready for church. God spoke to me plainly, and I knew his message was not just meant for me but to be shared.

As I was busy fretting over a few concerns this morning, God reminded me to take life one step at a time. God went on to remind me that I didn’t create the universe, and then laid Job 38 on my heart. “Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation? Tell me, if you understand. Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know! Who stretched a measuring line across it? On what were its footings set, or who laid its cornerstone—while the morning stars sang together and all the angels shouted for joy?” (4-7). It was a gentle rebuke, but a rebuke nonetheless. God called me out. I had nothing to do with creating the universe, let alone having anything to do with laying the earth’s foundation. Who am I to tell God how to be God, which I realize is, in essence, what I’m doing when I worry.

There’s no shortage of would be worries. Even if my own life was a stress free bliss, there are any number of people around me going through significant hardship. “But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own” (Matthew 6:33-34). Makes perfect sense that Jesus would use worry as an occasion to tell us to seek, foremost, the kingdom of heaven. After all, every time I get too focused on my problems, worry comes rushing in like a tidal wave and sweeps me away, at least for a little while. As he does over and over, throughout the gospels, Jesus seeks to redirect our focus from the things of this world to the kingdom of God. The big picture is much bigger than what my puny brain can comprehend, but every bit of it fits in the palm of God’s hand.

Finally, I’m reminded of Jesus’ prayer in the Garden of Gethsemane. “He went away a second time and prayed, ‘My Father, if it is not possible for this cup to be taken away unless I drink it, may your will be done'” Matthew 26:42). Our struggles, our pain, our illnesses, all of the grime and muck of life, are a consequence of being fallen, but I take heart in that our reward is a result of Christ overcoming it all. God’s will be done. God’s will is good.

Please sign up to follow my blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. God bless!

Advertisements